Cutting Edge 10MM 190gr PD Solid IN CLEAR BALLISTICS GEL.

Test Gun: Glock 20
Barrel length: 4.6 inches.
Ammunition: Cutting Edge 10MM 190gr PD solids.
Test media: 10% Clear Ballistics Gel.
Distance: 10 feet.
Chronograph: Caldwell Ballistic Precision Chronograph G2.
Five shot velocity average: 1089fps.

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A few years ago, I conducted a test on some solid copper bullets made by a company called Cutting Edge. In that test I tried out their 190gr .40 cal bullet in 10mm and the 200gr .45 bullet .45 ACP. I remember being very impressed with their performance and made the commit that they didn’t offer these bullets as a factory loaded option.

That has since change and Cutting Edge is not offering a 10mm and .357 magnum loaded ammo using their solid copper bullet. Good new for the people who do not handload but need or want a non-expanding solid copper bullet. It’s sold in 20 round boxes at a price of $41.39 not including shipping. This comes out to about $2 around, not cheap at all, but comparable to other solid copper bullets like the Lehigh Xtreme Penetrator line.

I contacted Cutting Edge asking if they would be willing to donate a box of their 10mm and .357 mag ammo for me to test. They were out of the .357, but they were kind enough to send me one box of 10mm.

The overall length of the round is 1.23 inches, loaded in Starline brass. The 5 shot average velocity was 1089fps with a high of 1098fps and a low of 1078fps for an extreme spread of 20fps. Their velocity was just a little slower than what I got when testing this bullet in my Colt Delta Elite. Out of the Glock 20 recoil was very manageable and my point of impact was just a little high at 10 yards. There were no functioning problems and the brass did not show any signs of excessive pressure.

The question at this point is, how will it penetrate? I expected similar performance to my handload considering how close the velocity was. I fired three rounds into the blocks. I didn’t get a velocity reading of the first round, but round two was 1109fps and three was 1070fps. Rounds one and two both penetrated 48 inches, a full three blocks. The third round went 47 inches before exiting the block and was found on the floor.

The recovered weight of all the bullets was 190 grains. There was no expansion, of course. Penetration was a little less then what I got from my handloads but only by a few inches. It should be pointed out that my test was with a 5 inch 1911 as apposed to a 4.6 inch Glock.

The penetration was also less than the hard cast loads I have tried, but much more than the Lehigh penetrators by twice as much. This is also a soft shooting load and would make for faster follow-up shots.

I know some of you are saying to yourself, why spend more for this when I can get deeper penetrating hard cast and less cost. Well depending on where you live hard cast lead may not be and option. In that case this bullet clearly out shoots the companion. Or maybe you shoot a Glock and Glock says not to shoot lead bullets. Or maybe you just don’t want to shoot lead for other reasons.

Whatever the reason, if you are looking for a solid copper 10mm factory round this one, in my option, if the best I have tried or know of.

One comment

  1. Nice except where is the photos of the gel??? 1100 fps is max would probably be over pressure if you go up. Which IMO over pressure is not smart. I fired several three groups 50 yards and all with different powder shot excellent groups and give us a base. Not sure yet but I thin #5 could be a great one. So i have loaded 50 10 each of various powders several charge weights and will test soon from a long slide Tanfoglio. Would have loved to see the gel with tacks.

    Like

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